Wonder Women: 25 Innovators, Inventors, and Trailblazers Who Changed History (Sam Maggs)

4 Oct

We don’t have nearly enough books outlining the remarkable women of history (and of the present).  If you’re looking for a particularly good one, you should definitely pick up a copy of Sam Maggs’ Wonder Women: 25 Innovators, Inventors, and Trailblazers Who Changed History.

 

wonder-women-sam-maggs

Squinklethoughts1. If you’ve ever had the pleasure of meeting Maggs (as I’ve been lucky enough to have had) or hearing her speak in the previews to silver-screen movies, then you know about her awesome cadence and witty remarks.  They’re all over Wonder Women, which is chock full of asides and parenthetical commentary.  I know some people aren’t fans of having too many interrupters, but I love them.  They make the stories in this book more interesting.  And funnier.

2. I only knew a handful of the women Maggs highlights in this book … which I’m sure is the same sentiment as many other readers, and which is proof-positive that WE NEED THIS BOOK in libraries and classrooms everywhere.  It’s a great introduction to fierce, intelligent, and confident women like Ada Lovelace (whom I knew) and Margaret Knight (whom I’d never heard of before now).

3. You’ll enjoy learning about Lise Meitner and her instrumental contributions to science; you’ll cheer for the gutsy Sarah Emma Edmonds who fought in the American Civil War … as a guy; and you’ll wholeheartedly agree with Maggs that Hollywood needs to make a movie about the tearjerker that was Anandibai Joshi life.

4. Sophia Foster-Dimino’s illustrations are lovely. They help bring Maggs’ words to life.

5. Because the stories of these inspirational women are reduced to a few pages, you won’t have any trouble getting through this book.  Even more, it’s really easy to jump around, so you can read about women of adventure before discovering the lives of women in espionage.

6. Teachers/parents, Wonder Women is a great read that would be an excellent purchase: it fills a gap on many bookshelves, for sure.  There are huge dollops of feminism throughout the stories (original subtitle: 25 Geek Girls Who Changed the World), but with or without labelling Maggs and her writing as such, the book stands on its own as a really fascinating and informative read.

4.5 Squinkles

Sam Maggs’ Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram |
YouTube | Tumblr | Chapters

Thank you, Quirk Books, for sending me a copy of Wonder Women in exchange for an honest review.

All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

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