Tag Archives: 4 squinkles

A Monster Like Me (Wendy S. Swore)

7 Mar

It’s really hard to put on your best face when all you want to do is hide it from everyone.  It’s even harder when you’re the new kid in school.  For a story full of acceptance, inclusion, and heart, pick up A Monster Like Me.

 

Monster Like Me Squinklethoughts

1.  If my students take anything away from this book, I hope it is that we all have some birthmark … some “fluctuation that differs us from the norm”.  And what makes us all the same is that we all have something different.  I love this message from the story.

2.  I also like that Swore made Sophie’s birthmark one that has no known cause.  That’s life, and no matter how much we try to find fault with something or someone, more often than not, some things just are.  I think it’s important for kids to learn that at an early age.

3.  It takes the entire length of the book for Sophie to accept herself (of course, because if she had been okay in the middle, where else would the story have gone?).  But I’m glad that there were a variety of obstacles that she had to overcome to get there.  I think having to deal with bullies, parents who don’t understand, and just generally strange behaviour from people makes Sophie stronger (as a person) and more likeable (as a character).  This is a great story about learning to love who you are.

4.  Autumn!  Sweet character.  Everyone should have an Autumn in his/her life.

5.  My favourite bits were the excerpts from The Big Book of Monsters.  We learn about goblins, fairies, orcs, gremlins, and so many other creatures.  I think any reader who’s into fantasy stories will appreciate meeting all of them!

 

Monster Like Me - Blog Tour

 

6.  Teachers/parents: Don’t hesitate to pick this book up for your readers.  It’s a good story that has tons of relevant topics, including coming of age, being the new girl, having a physical flaw, dealing with bullies, accepting oneself, and loyalty, and imagination.  Everyone can find an excellent takeaway from Swore’s debut novel.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Wendy S. Swore’s Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

 

Thank you, Shadow Mountain, for sending me a copy of
A Monster Like Me in exchange for an honest review.

 

All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

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You Go First (Erin Entrada Kelly)

30 Oct

If anyone needs a reminder that one person can make a difference in the life of another, this is the book for you.  Kelly’s sweet story will touch young and old alike.

 

You Go First

Squinklethoughts

1.  Charlotte and Ben are two average middle-schoolers trying to get through life that’s recently thrown them a few curve balls.  It’s hard enough for Charlotte to deal with her dad being in hospital after a heart attack, but now she has to navigate the murky waters of a BFF breakup, too.  Ben, meanwhile, has to resolve his feelings over his parents’ imminent divorce while juggling bullies and a bid for a student-council position.  Thank goodness Charlotte and Ben find one another as they’re dealing with their separate issues.  Even a friendly text now and then can ease the burden of a particularly terrible day.

2.  I’ve been in Charlotte’s position of dealing with the death of a friendship.  I’m glad Kelly doesn’t make it dramatic or messy – no big showdown in the cafeteria or confrontation in the girls’ washroom.  Sometimes friendships end quietly.  But I’m really happy that the pain of going through this kind of breakup is conveyed throughout the story.  I’m also especially pleased that there’s no scene where the adults try to help her deal with the end of that friendship.  Sometimes adults forget what it’s like to be kids, and no matter how well-meaning their intentions are, life (and later generations) don’t always work the way adults think it does (or should).  Sometimes two people just shouldn’t be friends, and that’s okay.

3.  On the other hand, I think I was waiting for just a bit more emotions from Ben towards his parents.  He stews about the divorce on his own, which I totally get, but I was left hanging when the family don’t really discuss much of anything related to it.  Even just the the logistics of living in different houses and the repercussions of not seeing both parents every day, I think, would be a pretty big change for any middle-grader.  Also, considering the huge scene at the end, I wanted to read about just deserts.

4.  I’m glad that the ending of the book isn’t incredibly tidy, but hopeful nonetheless.  I would have liked a bit more interaction between Charlotte and Ben, considering their lives intersect at some point.  I’ve only read the ARC version, though, so perhaps there’s an epilogue or something in the final copy.

5.  The dual-narrative structure here works very well.  I particularly enjoyed Kelly’s subheadings and preambles at the start of each chapter, which I found myself eagerly anticipating.

6.  Kelly’s writing style is very pleasing, and I think that’s one of the reasons my students have enjoyed this book so much.  Each character has a distinct voice, for sure, but there’s something inviting about the way Kelly writes.  It’s as if she knows the right combination of words to make kids feel safe and welcome in her story, and at the same time, she evokes memories in her adult readers about what it was like to be young once.  I’m very much looking forward to reading The Land of Forgotten Girls and Kelly’s other works.

7.  Teachers/parents: I read somewhere that a reader didn’t like this book because he/she thought the author is encouraging kids to be strangers on the internet.  Um, no.  That completely misses the point.  Yes, Charlotte and Ben do meet online, but on a student site geared towards and exclusive to student scrabble players, which means that registration is probably verified and monitored by teachers who actually know the kids.  It’s also made clear that Charlotte and Ben had been playing using pseudonyms for months before they eventually became friends, and even then, they had a hard time discussing personal issues.  The way the two meet, which can absolutely be addressed by parents and teachers, shouldn’t take the focus away from the comfort and stability that each character brings to the other.  There’s so much to love about this story.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Erin Entrada Kelly’s Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Chapters/Indigo

 

Thank you, Greenwillow Books, for sending me a copy of You Go First in exchange for an honest review.  All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

Megabat (Anna Humphrey and Kass Reich)

17 Sep

The tagline alone will hook you: “Itty-bitty bat, mega personality.”  Megabat is a sweet story about friends who discover each other by chance and hatch a plot to get one home … only to realize that they’ve already made a new home with one another.

 

Megabat Squinklethoughts

1.  Daniel is sad to have left his friends behind when he and his family moved three hours away, but soon, his mind is occupied with other thoughts.  Megabat is sad to be so, so far away from his home and family (definitely more than three hours away), but since Daniel doesn’t chase him off with a broom, he supposes that the boy may not be all that bad.  Sometimes we find people at the time in our lives when we need them most, and this is a great message in the story.

2.  It was cool learning a bit about Papaya Paradise, Megabat’s home, and I think kids would enjoy this part, too.  I would’ve liked to know some more though – maybe a comparison between Borneo’s and Toronto-ish’s climates, available food sources, or even natural predators, all of which Megabat has to contend with.

 

Megabat 2  

3.  This story is super cute, but I’m not completely sold on the author’s choice to have Megabat speak a sort of pidgin language.  On the one hand, I appreciate the fact that a talking bat wouldn’t have the same English-language skills as Daniel or Talia (Daniel’s new neighbour and friend), but how would Megabat have even known to speak his simplified version of English?  Also, the ease with which Daniel and Talia understand Megabat seems unlikely to me.  I know this might seem like a nitpicky thing, especially when considering that the story is lovely, but from a teacher’s perspective, I would find it difficult to use this text in class.  I’d be worried about how much of Megabat’s grammar my young students might retain.

4.  On the other hand, I can totally see someone reading this aloud to his/her kids (or students!) and employing a made-up or cutesy voice for Megabat.  If done well, that’s something I’m sure readers/listeners would enjoy.

5.  Bottom line: Despite the awkwardness that might come from Megabat’s grammar/diction, the sweet, underlying messages of friendship and family make this a worthwhile read for young kids.  There’s still a lot of good stuff to take away from this story.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Anna Humphrey’s Online Corners
Website | Twitter | Instagram | Chapters/Indigo

Kass Reich’s Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Tumblr | Instagram | Chapters/Indigo

 

Thank you, Tundra Books, for sending me a copy of Megabat in exchange for an honest review.  All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

The Hazel Wood (Melissa Albert)

14 Sep

I knew, entering this novel, that I was in for a wacky fairy-tale-esque ride, but I wasn’t adequately prepared for the adventures that I encountered … many of which happened even before I entered the Hazel Wood.

 

Hazel Wood Squinklethoughts

1.  I received a late ARC of this title, so I had already seen finished copies at bookstores.  I was so pleased that the ARC included the gorgeous cover of the final version because it’s breathtaking!  The gold embossed figures against a black backdrop scream elegance and intrigue at the same time.  I spent a good while trying to figure out how each image – a comb, a dagger, torn pages, to name a few – might fit into the story.  Just from the cover alone, I knew this would make an excellent lesson for my students.

2.  I don’t know if this story can fit seamlessly into any one genre.  On the one hand, it’s definitely meant for YA audiences because some of the scenes are too mature for my youngsters.  On the other hand, anyone who loves fairy tales will enjoy the allusions in this story, regardless of the age of the reader.  The noir-ish feel of this story is particularly alluring.

3.  So what’s The Hazel Wood got that makes it a worthwhile read?

  • Unpredictable plot … Sure, you could slap various scenes against a plot graph and see the overall arc, but I would never, in a million years, have seen most of what transpired coming.  There are surprises, left and right, by way of betrayals, unexpected enemies, unlikely alliances, sheep in wolves’ clothing, … all of which propel the story to its final destination.

  • Interesting characters … The MC, Alice, is quite likeable.  She’s a little self-deprecating, but not annoyingly so.  Because she discovers truths about her life at the same time as the reader does, we can feel very much as if we’re part of her journey.  I also really like her relationship with her mom.  Oh, and Alice Proserpine – great name.

  • Mini side stories … It’s almost like the various tales of Beedle the Bard are strewn throughout the narrative.  Some side stories reveal info pertinent to Alice’s plotline, and others are just colourful tapestries that add to the noir-ness of the book.

4.  If you’re looking for a unique take on well-known fairy-tale creatures, villains, heroines, and overall fantasy feel, you’ll definitely enjoy Albert’s The Hazel Wood.  The author does a great job building her world and fleshing out her characters.  Even if this kind of story is not your thing, you’ll still find enough mysteries that you’ll want to keep reading to see which are solved at the end.

5.  Teachers/parents: There are some scenes (mostly in dialogue, but also in situation, including references to intimate relations) that may be too mature for some kids in elementary school.  Some of the actions in the story, which revolve around hurting/killing people might also be too scary or violent for younger readers.  Writer’s Craft teachers will find this novel to be a rich source of potential lessons and activities.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Melissa Albert’s Online Corners
Website | Twitter | Instagram | Chapters/Indigo

 

Thank you, Flatiron Books, for sending me a copy of The Hazel Wood in exchange for an honest review.  All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

Ella and Owen #1: The Cave of Aaaaah! Doom! (Jaden Kent)

12 Sep

Sibling rivalries make for awesome stories – in real life and in books.  If you’ve got young’uns who love to squabble with their brothers and/or sisters, they might love the antics of twins Ella and Owen!

 

Ella and Owen 1 Squinklethoughts

1.  Okay, so Ella and Owen don’t always fight … sometimes, they just argue.  In this first of a long-running series, Owen has a cold, but it’s not so bad.  He can stay in bed to read stories about hairy trolls, magical fairies, and heroic dragons.  But Ella thinks they should look for Orlock Morlock, a dragon wizard who is rumoured to be able to cure anything.  It will probably be smooth sailing, right?  My students got into this story right away, and it has a lot to do with its compelling intro.

2.  The story has some very imaginative features, including Ella and Owen encountering an ogre (a little terrifying) and an evil veggie wizard (super terrifying).  Lots of great fun!

 

Ella and Owen 1 - 1-2

 Ella and Owen 1 - 3-4  

3.  The sibling love-hate relationship thing works very well in this story, and engenders lots of funny dialogue between the two main characters.  I’m sure many readers can imagine having similar conversations about escaping ogres and other fantastical creatures with their own dear siblings.

4.  The illustrations are great and really bring out the personalities of Ella and Owen – not to mention the other characters they encounter!  Even better is the fact that the first book ends on a very exciting cliffhanger – my students were begging for the follow-up.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Jaden Kent’s Online Corners
Website | Chapters/Indigo – the 2nd book!

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