Tag Archives: 4 squinkles

Megabat (Anna Humphrey and Kass Reich)

17 Sep

The tagline alone will hook you: “Itty-bitty bat, mega personality.”  Megabat is a sweet story about friends who discover each other by chance and hatch a plot to get one home … only to realize that they’ve already made a new home with one another.

 

Megabat Squinklethoughts

1.  Daniel is sad to have left his friends behind when he and his family moved three hours away, but soon, his mind is occupied with other thoughts.  Megabat is sad to be so, so far away from his home and family (definitely more than three hours away), but since Daniel doesn’t chase him off with a broom, he supposes that the boy may not be all that bad.  Sometimes we find people at the time in our lives when we need them most, and this is a great message in the story.

2.  It was cool learning a bit about Papaya Paradise, Megabat’s home, and I think kids would enjoy this part, too.  I would’ve liked to know some more though – maybe a comparison between Borneo’s and Toronto-ish’s climates, available food sources, or even natural predators, all of which Megabat has to contend with.

 

Megabat 2  

3.  This story is super cute, but I’m not completely sold on the author’s choice to have Megabat speak a sort of pidgin language.  On the one hand, I appreciate the fact that a talking bat wouldn’t have the same English-language skills as Daniel or Talia (Daniel’s new neighbour and friend), but how would Megabat have even known to speak his simplified version of English?  Also, the ease with which Daniel and Talia understand Megabat seems unlikely to me.  I know this might seem like a nitpicky thing, especially when considering that the story is lovely, but from a teacher’s perspective, I would find it difficult to use this text in class.  I’d be worried about how much of Megabat’s grammar my young students might retain.

4.  On the other hand, I can totally see someone reading this aloud to his/her kids (or students!) and employing a made-up or cutesy voice for Megabat.  If done well, that’s something I’m sure readers/listeners would enjoy.

5.  Bottom line: Despite the awkwardness that might come from Megabat’s grammar/diction, the sweet, underlying messages of friendship and family make this a worthwhile read for young kids.  There’s still a lot of good stuff to take away from this story.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Anna Humphrey’s Online Corners
Website | Twitter | Instagram | Chapters/Indigo

Kass Reich’s Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Tumblr | Instagram | Chapters/Indigo

 

Thank you, Tundra Books, for sending me a copy of Megabat in exchange for an honest review.  All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

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The Hazel Wood (Melissa Albert)

14 Sep

I knew, entering this novel, that I was in for a wacky fairy-tale-esque ride, but I wasn’t adequately prepared for the adventures that I encountered … many of which happened even before I entered the Hazel Wood.

 

Hazel Wood Squinklethoughts

1.  I received a late ARC of this title, so I had already seen finished copies at bookstores.  I was so pleased that the ARC included the gorgeous cover of the final version because it’s breathtaking!  The gold embossed figures against a black backdrop scream elegance and intrigue at the same time.  I spent a good while trying to figure out how each image – a comb, a dagger, torn pages, to name a few – might fit into the story.  Just from the cover alone, I knew this would make an excellent lesson for my students.

2.  I don’t know if this story can fit seamlessly into any one genre.  On the one hand, it’s definitely meant for YA audiences because some of the scenes are too mature for my youngsters.  On the other hand, anyone who loves fairy tales will enjoy the allusions in this story, regardless of the age of the reader.  The noir-ish feel of this story is particularly alluring.

3.  So what’s The Hazel Wood got that makes it a worthwhile read?

  • Unpredictable plot … Sure, you could slap various scenes against a plot graph and see the overall arc, but I would never, in a million years, have seen most of what transpired coming.  There are surprises, left and right, by way of betrayals, unexpected enemies, unlikely alliances, sheep in wolves’ clothing, … all of which propel the story to its final destination.

  • Interesting characters … The MC, Alice, is quite likeable.  She’s a little self-deprecating, but not annoyingly so.  Because she discovers truths about her life at the same time as the reader does, we can feel very much as if we’re part of her journey.  I also really like her relationship with her mom.  Oh, and Alice Proserpine – great name.

  • Mini side stories … It’s almost like the various tales of Beedle the Bard are strewn throughout the narrative.  Some side stories reveal info pertinent to Alice’s plotline, and others are just colourful tapestries that add to the noir-ness of the book.

4.  If you’re looking for a unique take on well-known fairy-tale creatures, villains, heroines, and overall fantasy feel, you’ll definitely enjoy Albert’s The Hazel Wood.  The author does a great job building her world and fleshing out her characters.  Even if this kind of story is not your thing, you’ll still find enough mysteries that you’ll want to keep reading to see which are solved at the end.

5.  Teachers/parents: There are some scenes (mostly in dialogue, but also in situation, including references to intimate relations) that may be too mature for some kids in elementary school.  Some of the actions in the story, which revolve around hurting/killing people might also be too scary or violent for younger readers.  Writer’s Craft teachers will find this novel to be a rich source of potential lessons and activities.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Melissa Albert’s Online Corners
Website | Twitter | Instagram | Chapters/Indigo

 

Thank you, Flatiron Books, for sending me a copy of The Hazel Wood in exchange for an honest review.  All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

Ella and Owen #1: The Cave of Aaaaah! Doom! (Jaden Kent)

12 Sep

Sibling rivalries make for awesome stories – in real life and in books.  If you’ve got young’uns who love to squabble with their brothers and/or sisters, they might love the antics of twins Ella and Owen!

 

Ella and Owen 1 Squinklethoughts

1.  Okay, so Ella and Owen don’t always fight … sometimes, they just argue.  In this first of a long-running series, Owen has a cold, but it’s not so bad.  He can stay in bed to read stories about hairy trolls, magical fairies, and heroic dragons.  But Ella thinks they should look for Orlock Morlock, a dragon wizard who is rumoured to be able to cure anything.  It will probably be smooth sailing, right?  My students got into this story right away, and it has a lot to do with its compelling intro.

2.  The story has some very imaginative features, including Ella and Owen encountering an ogre (a little terrifying) and an evil veggie wizard (super terrifying).  Lots of great fun!

 

Ella and Owen 1 - 1-2

 Ella and Owen 1 - 3-4  

3.  The sibling love-hate relationship thing works very well in this story, and engenders lots of funny dialogue between the two main characters.  I’m sure many readers can imagine having similar conversations about escaping ogres and other fantastical creatures with their own dear siblings.

4.  The illustrations are great and really bring out the personalities of Ella and Owen – not to mention the other characters they encounter!  Even better is the fact that the first book ends on a very exciting cliffhanger – my students were begging for the follow-up.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Jaden Kent’s Online Corners
Website | Chapters/Indigo – the 2nd book!

The Nocturnals #4: The Hidden Kingdom (Tracey Hecht and Sarah Fieber)

10 Sep

Oof … Apologies for all the “Temporary Posts” emails!  Since WLW doesn’t do updates or support anymore, I can’t figure out how to do some things.  It’s all a bit trial-and-error for me, Squinks!

Anyhoo, the Nocturnal Brigade is back in their fourth adventure, and it’s the best one yet!  Tobin (a pangolin), Bismark (a sugar glider), and Dawn (a fox) have to find a way to save themselves and their night-time neighbours from a drought that has plagued them all.

 

Nocturnals 4 Squinklethoughts

1.  Okay, first things first, this series taught me that there is even an animal called a sugar glider.  Yup … had no idea it existed until now.  I love that a whole menagerie of animals are found in these books, and I love it even more that many of them work together (for good and for bad!) to accomplish their tasks.  Stories are always fun when you’ve got a bunch of different characters join forces for a common goal, and this tale is no exception.

2.  Bismark is ever charming, as he was in the first three books.  He is incorrigible in his flirting with Dawn, but he genuinely cares for her and the rest of his friends.  His anecdotes and bravado get wilder (and funnier) as the story progresses, which add some levity to the brigade’s troubles.  Tobin is quite funny, too, especially when he’s constantly blamed for the strange odours and squeaky noises around him.  My students found these bits particularly funny.  All in all, the characters drive this series just as much as the plot lines do, which is a great reason for the success of these stories.

 

Nocturnals 4 2

 

3.  One of the best things about The Nocturnals series is the cast of characters that Hecht and Fieber have assembled.  Whether they’re part of the Nocturnal Brigade or playing a supporting role, the animals are witty, unique, and memorable.

4.  Teachers/parents: There are so many animals in this book and in the series that ways to incorporate them into lessons and classes just kept popping into my head as I was reading.  But beyond its potential use in the classroom, anyone who loves animals or enjoys reading stories with animals in them would definitely enjoy this series.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Tracey Hecht and Sarah Fieber’s Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube | Chapters/Indigo

 

Thank you, Fabled Films Press, for sending me a copy of The Nocturnals: The Hidden Kingdom in exchange for an honest review.  All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

Tales of Sasha #1: The Big Secret (Alexa Pearl)

7 Sep

If you have little ones looking to start a well-established series that’s about friendship and bravery, look no further than the Tales of Sasha books by Alexa Pearl.

 

Tales of Sasha 1

Squinklethoughts

1.  In The Big Secret, Sasha, a young horse, has always felt just a little different from her friends and family.  She sometimes has a hard time following the rules – not that she wants to be a troublemaker, of course!  But something inside her just makes her move differently.  The way that Sasha leaps across the sky, enjoying the breeze blowing through her mane, seems so magical, and is enough to hook kids into wondering what surprises the rest of the story has in store.

2.  I love that this book lets young readers know that it’s okay to be different because sometimes a person’s differences are actually sources of strength.  The whole series makes it easy to talk to kids about topics like uniqueness, appearances, and finding oneself.

3.  The friendship between Twinkle and Sasha is sweet.  Although Twinkle is wary about getting into trouble because of her friend, she is just the companion that Sasha needs.  In subsequent stories, we get to know more about the rest of the horses in Verdant Valley and Crystal Cove, and they’re a wonderfully colourful cast of characters!

4.  The illustrations in this series are top notch.  Are there going to be stuffed toys made of the cute little horses?  Gorgeous images!  I seriously think that part of the reason my younger students love this series is the lovely world of Sasha and her friends, which are so richly drawn and coloured.  I’d love to put up posters or give away postcards of this story for Halloween or something.

 

Tales of Sasha 1 - 1 

Tales of Sasha 1 - 2-3  

5.  Teachers/parents: This book and series would be great for early readers, especially those who invest themselves in long-term stories with the same characters.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Alexa Pearl’s Online Corners
Website | Chapters/Indigo

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