Tag Archives: 4 squinkles

Supreme Power: 7 Pivotal Supreme Court Decisions (Ted Stewart)

13 Nov

The physical book itself is not very long, but Supreme Power: 7 Pivotal Supreme Court Decisions that Had a Major Impact on America packs a wallop.  Historians, poli-sci students, and lay people alike will find Ted Stewart’s discussion of significant Supreme Court decisions gripping and educational.

 

Supreme Power Squinklethoughts

1.  This book is for you if you want to know how the Supreme Court began and why a Justice once said, “We are not final because we are infallible, but we are infallible only because we are final.”  The intro hooks you in right away.  Stewart discusses the Founding Fathers, their vision for the new country, and even some personal vendettas against one another.  I guess if you want to learn about how the highest court in the land got to be that way, you have to start at the beginning.  I find it really interesting that the number of Justices has fluctuated throughout history.  Also, it’s incredible how many appeals there are every year, and how many are actually heard and decided by the Court.

2.  The divide between prescriptive and descriptive linguists today neatly mirror the two philosophical types of Justices that Stewart describes – the Originalist and the Constitutionalist.  I found this part particularly interesting because I could see how similarly different many tenets of the two political parties are.  As I read through the chapters, I found myself seeing each case from the view of both philosophies, and it’s no wonder they had to go to the Supreme Court for final decisions.

3.  The section on Plessy v. Ferguson, which discusses the onset of the term “Jim Crow” and how the idea of “separate but equal accommodations” led to problems we continue to see today, was a good read.  Stewart recounts the Court’s ruling that the Louisiana Separate Car Act was not in violation of either the Thirteenth or Fourteenth Amendments.  As far as class discussions go, this chapter would make a great springboard for talking about what constitutes “established usages, customs, and traditions” and whether a few years is enough time for a custom to become established.

4.  Another chapter that I liked was “How a Law on Bakers’ Working Hours Led to Abortion Rights”.  I enjoyed learning about Lochner and the belief that part of our birthright is the right to work as long or as hard as we want.  I also like that Stewart poses the question on who defines “liberty” and what “due process” actually (or should actually) means.  I would have liked more of a discussion on the proceedings and consequences of Roe v. Wade.  Stewart discusses Lochner a lot, but he leaves the Court’s decision on Roe v. Wade to a few paragraphs.  I think the pivotal impact of McCorvey’s case shouldn’t have been considered outside the scope of this book.

 

Supreme Power 2  

5.  I didn’t take any poli-sci or history classes in university – at least not ones that explored the Supreme Court and its decisions – so I was happy to learn about the cases Stewart presents.  This book would be great for anyone who wants to know a little bit about them and American political origins.  It would also make a good addition to senior high-school and university courses.  I don’t know if I would assign the entire book, but I’d definitely pick a couple of cases (and the intro) for students to get into.  A caveat, however: Stewart uses jargon that the average person might have heard of but don’t understand.  If I were to give excerpts of this book to non-poli-sci students, I’d have to include a glossary so that they don’t get lost in legalese.

6.  Aside from a glossary that would have helped even me, I would have liked to find an index at the end so that I could find pages related to specific mentions of Justices or cases more easily.  A very extensive bibliography is included though.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Ted Stewart’s Online Corners
US District Court Profile | Chapters/Indigo

 

Thank you, Shadow Mountain, for sending me a copy of Supreme Power: 7 Pivotal Supreme Court Decisions that Had a Major Impact on America in exchange for an honest review.

All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

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Mutant Bunny Island (Obert Skye)

7 Nov

If you’re looking for a story about cute, fluffy bunnies, then this isn’t really the book for you.  Well, actually, hang on.  There ARE cute, fluffy bunnies here, but don’t forget that even the title warns you that mutants abound.

 

Mutant Bunny Island Squinklethoughts

1.  I like stories that are smart-funny, not just slapstick-funny.  Skye’s writing has that in spades.  I loved all the word play in the book, most especially because I think my students will really appreciate his cleverness.  I mean, the first chapter is called “Getting Squiddy with It”, for goodness’ sake.

2.  Perry is a lovable character whom, I think, many people will be able to identify with.  I would much rather stay indoors than enjoy the allergens outside – though for him, he’s avoiding newts, not ragweed.  He seems to have a great relationship with his dad.  I wish the author had explored more the reasons his mom isn’t in the picture, but it looks like Mr. Owens is really trying to be a good dad AND friend to Perry.

3.  Rain is so annoying at first, and it takes quite a while for me to warm up to him.  I suppose there’s not much to do on his island, but still.  I’m glad he becomes less annoying towards the end.

4.  I’m also glad that although there are hints of Perry blushing around Juliet, that storyline doesn’t dip into romance, which the story doesn’t need.  If there’s to be another book with these characters, I’d be more interested in seeing how the friendship among Perry, Juliet, and Rain develop than in any potential love story.  And even without a love plot, I’d love to read Perry’s awkwardness at dealing with girls.

5.  One of the best things about this book is that it intersperses elements of graphic novels with the narrative structure.  The artwork after every chapter not only provides back stories of Admiral Uli and the rest of the squids that Perry wishes were his friends, but it also serves to give readers a pause from the main story.  For many of my kids who sometimes have a hard time getting through novels, this set-up is absolutely perfect.

 

Mutant Bunny Island 2

 

6.  The squid humour is great.  Just thought I’d add that in again.  Our library copy has already been borrowed and loved, so I know this will be a great hit amongst my kids who love funny, fast-paced stories with great art.

7.  Teachers/parents, want to see if this is book is for your child/ren?  Check out a sample here.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Obert Skye’s Online Corners
Facebook | Twitter | Chapters/Indigo

 

Eduardo Vieira’s Online Corners
Facebook | Twitter | Chapters/Indigo

 

Thank you, Harper Collins, for sending me a copy of
Mutant Bunny Island in exchange for an honest review.

All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

The Secret of Nightingale Wood (Lucy Strange)

26 Oct

If you like reading stories with strong and sweet heroines, family relationships, and life after a war, I’m sure you’ll love Lucy Strange’s The Secret of Nightingale Wood.

 

Secret of Nightingale Wood Squinklethoughts

1.  It’s been nearly 100 years since the Great War ended, and most of my students AND the people around them are far removed from the effects of the war.  But it’s called the Great War because it’s the first time that so many people from so many lands and across so many fronts have been affected by a mutual event.  There are lots of great stories about soldiers before, during, and after battles, including one we read in French class called Journal d’un soldat.  But some of my favourite stories are about the people at home – mothers, sisters, and friends, awaiting news of their loved ones, and rebuilding their lives upon their loved ones’ return or … permanent leave.  The Secret of Nightingale Wood reminds you of how war often rips apart families.

2.  Henry is a lovely, authentic heroine.  She’s at the great age where she’s stuck between having true independence in her teenage years and enjoying enough freedom to think and feel the way she wants to, regardless of how other people tell her to behave.  She loves her little sister, Piglet, and if I didn’t like Henry for anything else, I’d respect her for that.  What a great older sister to have.

3.  Henry is brave but not reckless.  I would have been too scared to enter the woods, so I applaud her courage in doing so, but she also recognizes when to be on her guard.  She takes calculated risks, including visiting her mother who’s been locked in a room, if need be or if her heart can’t take it any longer.  She is also wracked with guilt that her last conversation with her brother, Robert, was a fight.  I don’t know if this is what makes her push herself to be brave, but she tries really hard to keep her family together once her family seems to be ripped apart.

4.  I like that Henry’s plan towards the end of the story isn’t completely out of this world.  I don’t like endings that employ deus ex machina or have some sort of implausible, neatly tied dénouement, so I like that Henry’s solution isn’t too easy to be believable.

5.  I was a bit annoyed with Nanny Jane.  Her heart seems to be in the right place, but I feel like she bends too easily to forces outside Hope House.  If Henry and Piglet are her primary charges, why would she let others’ opinions sway her from doing her job?

6.  Dr. and Mrs. Hardy – ugh.  Dislike both of them with a sneer.  And Dr. Chilvers, too.  Aren’t the best characters to hate the ones you know smile with duplicity (even though you can’t actually see them smiling)?

7.  Moth is a lovely, bittersweet character.  She’s caring and motherly towards Henry, but sadness and pain just oozes out of her.  I’m glad that she has small bits of beauty in her life.  I think Henry saves Moth just as much as Moth saves Henry.  I can imagine them having a nice, long friendship.

 

Secret of Nightingale Wood 3

 

8.  I let my book fall open on a page, and it happened to be on one where there is a letter set in a different font from the rest of the story.  The final copy of the book may have this letter in a different font than the ARC I read, but the font – Janda Elegant Handwriting or something remarkably similar – has been one of my favourite ones for as long as I can remember.  It’s even the font I use for the header of my blog, which tells you how much I love it.  I guess I knew from the moment I saw that letter in the book that this was going to be a good, heart-tugging story.

9.  Teachers/parents, there are many lessons you can do with this novel.  The biggest one is a discussion on the effects of war and death on an entire family and community.  Right from the beginning, we know that Robert, Henry’s older brother, has died, and with him, bits of their parents have died, too.  We also find out later on about another boy who has died.  The two deaths, though from different causes, rock two families and a community.  This could be a teachable moment in terms of the ripples people make.  Also, there are tons of allusions to classic lit, which would make a great side project.

10.  The Secret of Nightingale Wood is set to pub on October 31.  You definitely want to put this on your bookshelf!  There’s so much heart in this story.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Lucy Strange’s Online Corners
Facebook | Twitter | Chapters/Indigo

 

Thank you, Scholastic Canada, for sending me a copy of The Secret of Nightingale Wood in exchange for an honest review.

All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

All the Crooked Saints (Maggie Stiefvater)

13 Oct

If you’re in the mood for a tale full of magic and mystery, Maggie Stiefvater’s All the Crooked Saints may be just what you need!

 All the Crooked Saints

Squinklethoughts

1.  Okay, Squinks.  This is my first Maggie Stiefvater book.  I know, right?  So many of you have suggested that I read The Raven Cycle series, and I just might pick it up, knowing how great her writing is.

2.  Here is a thing I felt after reading a few chapters of All the Crooked Saints: This is not the book for me.  Here is a thing I felt on the last page of the book: Boy, am I glad I stuck it out.

 

All the Crooked Saints 2  

3.  I like magical realism, and I’d definitely describe this story as such.  But this wasn’t the magical realism I expected.  There is a priest with a coyote head, a snake entwining twins, and a girl who, like Echo, can only speak when spoken to, repeating the very same words she is told.  If I had known that from the very beginning, I may not have picked this book up at all.  So if you’re into that kind of stuff, you’ll have a lot of fun with this book.

4.  What kept me going even after I realized that the elements of the story weren’t quite what I expected was Stiefvater’s incredible writing.  She has such a way with words and telling life truths that I got lost in her magical turns of phrases, and I just kept on reading.  Her writing prowess is reminiscent of J.K. Rowling’s own pen wizardry.  They’re both so quotable, so authentic.

 

All the Crooked Saints - Quotations

 

5.  Once I got the dramatis personae all figured out, it was a lot easier to get into the Soria family’s and the pilgrim’s plights.  Beatriz, Joaquin, and Daniel have such a close bond.  It was great to see that among cousins and among people who are quite different from one another.  The relationship between Antonio and Francisco was really interesting.  How could a couple get that way when they obviously love each other so much?  The pilgrims all have very intriguing stories, too.  I was especially enamoured by Marisita’s back story, which I’m glad Stiefvater reveals.  I also like the relationship that develops between Tony and Pete – strangers who become friends because of circumstances.  By the end of the story, I was rooting for all the Sorias and pilgrims to get what they needed … not just what they’re looking for.

6.  Teachers, there are a lot of things you can do with this book in school.  Lots of themes pop up throughout the novel, especially ones about family, friendship, and courage.  The title might seem like this is a super-religious book, but even without knowing much about Catholicism or saints or caring about any religion at all, readers will still enjoy the plot.  If I were to pick this book up as a text for a class, I’d definitely do some explorations on character POVs, a big discussion on metaphors and allegory, and a lesson on the writer’s craft, using Stiefvater’s fine writing as an example.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Maggie Stiefvater’s Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr
Indigo/Chapters

 

Thank you, Scholastic Press, for sending me a copy of
All the Crooked Saints in exchange for an honest review.

All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

Mustaches for Maddie (Chad Morris and Shelly Brown)

6 Oct

If you’ve ever been faced with a grave illness, sometimes, you can find solace in knowing other people have gone through the same thing – even if those other people are charming characters in a novel.  Mustaches for Maddie is a great read for anyone who has ever worried a lot.

 

Mustaches for Maddie 1

Squinklethoughts

1.  Mustaches for Maddie is based on a true story, which makes it even more poignant.  I love Maddie.  She’s funny and sweet.  She’s annoyed with her brothers, but she loves them to death.  Her parents’ tears make her heart expand and feel squishy at the same time.  I love that she cares so much for her family, and she worries about how her diagnosis affects them.

2.  Aside from handling an illness, Maddie has to go through typical middle-grade problems, and it was great for the authors to explore this.  I was worried that they’d focus on Maddie being sick for the entire book, but the story delves into problems at school with friends, boys, and life in general, too.  Of course, the big problem in the story is how Maddie goes about her day as normally as she can while having a not-so-normal health issue, but it’s good for readers to know that the other things in life keep going … even though it’s hard to think much of anything else in Maddie’s situation.

 

Mustaches for Maddie  

3.  I loved Maddie’s friends, Lexi, Yasmin, and Devin.  They’re kind and loyal and the type of friends I would wish on anyone.  I also love that Maddie doesn’t always say or do the right thing when it comes to her schoolmates because it really is hard sometimes to say or do the right things at the right time.  She trips over herself (literally and figuratively), but she battles through the awkward moments.  Maddie’s stream of consciousness was a refreshing part of this book.  We get to hear (read) Maddie’s inner monologue about what she really wants to say and what she actually feels (about dragoporkisaurs, her twisty arm, and mean girls … you know, the usual stuff), so we know her true self … even though it’s hard for her sometimes to reveal it.  This makes her narration all the more authentic and interesting.

 

Mustaches for Maddie 3

 

4.  As an English teacher, I loved the fact that elementary kids are learning the major themes and popular lines in Shakespeare’s plays.  It makes it easier for high-school teachers to teach the Bard’s works, for sure.  I didn’t meet Shakey until I was in grade 9, so I really liked this part of Maddie’s school life.

5.  Cassie … ugh.  We all know a Cassie.  I have known several Cassies.  I love that the authors make her really malicious because it means they don’t shy away from the idea that there really are kids like that.  Sorry, Squinks.  There really are kids like that sometimes.

6.  Teachers, this is a great title to add to your school library, and especially your classrooms.  Shadow Mountain has even put together a very helpful guide for incorporating Mustaches for Maddie in your lessons.  Click here.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Chad Morris’ Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Twitter

 

Shelly Brown’s Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Twitter

 

Thank you, Shadow Mountain, for sending me a copy of Mustaches for Maddie in exchange for an honest review.

All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

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