Tag Archives: mg

Squint (Chad Morris & Shelly Brown)

14 Oct

Middle school is hard enough, but imagine having to go through all the craziness of school while also losing your vision.  In Squint, Morris and Brown introduce Flint, a very sweet and uplifting character who’s going blind and is not part of the in-crowd, but who finds solace in drawing his comic book and making a new friend.

 

Squint Squinklethoughts

1.  Squint (real name Flint) is such a nice guy.  I wish there were more kids like him.  He’s very observant about the dynamics of school and how people interact with one another.  He’s also quite honest about his fears about losing his sight, not finishing his comic book on time, and generally not ever being accepted.  What I love most about him is his authenticity.  The story is told from his perspective, and I think my students will really find a friend in him because he tells his story well.

2.  McKell is also a great character.  It must be difficult dealing with a terminally ill sibling.  It’s one thing to deal with death, but even at my “mature” (ha) age, I still find it hard to hear that someone my age is dying.  Mostly, I’m happy that McKell chooses to not follow her friends in the way they make fun of Squint.  I’m hoping that someone who reads this story will be inspired by McKell deciding to befriend him instead of treating him poorly.  Imagine what both of them would miss out on if they had never met.

3.  I love that Squint lists various rules.  In fact, I think they would have made great chapter subtitles!

4.  This whole narrative gently nudges readers to consider their choices carefully without seeming too … preachy, for lack of a better word.  When Squint’s grandpa encourages him to be proud of the hard work he puts into his drawings, it highlights the idea that quitting, while sometimes easier, is not necessarily the best choice.  And when Squint comes into the kitchen with a glint in his eye, and his grandma tells him that his grandpa would advise him to treat his friend really well, it was a much nicer way of teaching Squint to be considerate of others.  You catch more flies with honey, they say, eh?

 

Squint 2  

5.  I like the multimodal aspects of the story.  Besides the rules that Squint mentions periodically, there are comic-book excerpts and text exchanges between the characters.  They enhance the story simply by giving readers a break from the traditional narrative format.  More and more, I see my young readers devouring these kinds of texts.

6.  Teachers/parents: You’ll definitely want to add this story to your shelves.  It’s a nice way to introduce readers to topics like fitting in, making friends, being sick, getting advice from your grandparents, and ultimately accepting who you are.

 

4.5 Squinkles

 

Chad Morris’ Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Twitter

Shelly Brown’s Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Twitter

 

Thanks, Shadow Mountain, for sending me a copy of Squint in exchange for an honest review.  All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

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The Nocturnals #4: The Hidden Kingdom (Tracey Hecht and Sarah Fieber)

10 Sep

Oof … Apologies for all the “Temporary Posts” emails!  Since WLW doesn’t do updates or support anymore, I can’t figure out how to do some things.  It’s all a bit trial-and-error for me, Squinks!

Anyhoo, the Nocturnal Brigade is back in their fourth adventure, and it’s the best one yet!  Tobin (a pangolin), Bismark (a sugar glider), and Dawn (a fox) have to find a way to save themselves and their night-time neighbours from a drought that has plagued them all.

 

Nocturnals 4 Squinklethoughts

1.  Okay, first things first, this series taught me that there is even an animal called a sugar glider.  Yup … had no idea it existed until now.  I love that a whole menagerie of animals are found in these books, and I love it even more that many of them work together (for good and for bad!) to accomplish their tasks.  Stories are always fun when you’ve got a bunch of different characters join forces for a common goal, and this tale is no exception.

2.  Bismark is ever charming, as he was in the first three books.  He is incorrigible in his flirting with Dawn, but he genuinely cares for her and the rest of his friends.  His anecdotes and bravado get wilder (and funnier) as the story progresses, which add some levity to the brigade’s troubles.  Tobin is quite funny, too, especially when he’s constantly blamed for the strange odours and squeaky noises around him.  My students found these bits particularly funny.  All in all, the characters drive this series just as much as the plot lines do, which is a great reason for the success of these stories.

 

Nocturnals 4 2

 

3.  One of the best things about The Nocturnals series is the cast of characters that Hecht and Fieber have assembled.  Whether they’re part of the Nocturnal Brigade or playing a supporting role, the animals are witty, unique, and memorable.

4.  Teachers/parents: There are so many animals in this book and in the series that ways to incorporate them into lessons and classes just kept popping into my head as I was reading.  But beyond its potential use in the classroom, anyone who loves animals or enjoys reading stories with animals in them would definitely enjoy this series.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Tracey Hecht and Sarah Fieber’s Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube | Chapters/Indigo

 

Thank you, Fabled Films Press, for sending me a copy of The Nocturnals: The Hidden Kingdom in exchange for an honest review.  All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

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