Tag Archives: new york

Together at Midnight (Jennifer Castle)

26 Apr

I love stories about the end of the year, which is really what drew me to this one to begin with.  Add to that the premise of practising random acts of kindness, and I was sold!  Together at Midnight is a sweet story about finding yourself while being kind to others.

 

Together at Midnight

Squinklethoughts

1.  I started reading Together at Midnight way past midnight, and I was already on page 81 by the time I realized an hour had passed.  I had meant to just start the book to get a feel for it, but the first few chapters flew by really quickly.  If you like fast-paced stories and short chapters, you’ll love this.

2.  Kendall and Max are equally strong and compelling narrators.  It was great to read the story through their distinct voices.  Kendall is a very lovely flawed character.  She’s just spent a semester abroad in a school program that takes kids across various European countries.  For her, it was the perfect way to earn credits while undergoing teaching and learning styles that she could handle.  As the youngest and only girl in the family, Kendall has had supportive parents and siblings throughout her life, but there are some struggles she has to face alone.  Kendall is a great protagonist for anyone who’s ever felt just behind every one else – grasping academic concepts a little slower, or enjoying social milestones a little later.  She’s friendly and brave and optimistic, which makes it easy for other characters to like her, even if she can be hard on herself, but she really just needs time to grow.

3.  I was rooting for Max all the way.  He seems like the ultimate gentleman when it comes to his treatment of both Eliza, his erstwhile girlfriend, and Kendall.  He’s also a caring person, as evidenced by his relationship with his curmudgeon of a grandpa, Big E.  But what I like about Max best are his flaws.  Sometimes he cares a little too much, and that turns him into a helicopter parent, or – worse – he derails his life to help someone, even if he’s not asked to do so.  He actually reminds me a lot of Ted Mosby, architect.  He is inherently kind and obviously smart to have been accepted to Brown, but he, too, needs a little growing up.

4.  The adventures in this book take place during that fuzzy week between Christmas and New Year’s when you don’t know what day it is, but you’re thankful it’s still the holidays.  I love that.  I also love Castle’s decision to set this story in New York City, in and around the hustle and bustle of Times Square, a beating heart of a metropolis if there ever were one.  So many different cafés to try out, so many different people to observe.  I’ve been to NYC a handful of times now, and it’s so easy to see why Kendall and Max’s challenge works well here – and why the city itself helps the two of them evolve.

5.  I’m often wary about multiple narrators within a story, but Castle’s choice makes perfect sense.  In fact, knowing the thoughts of the people that Kendall and Max encounter adds a wonderful depth to the story for the readers.  It’s like a very satisfying instance of dramatic irony, especially when the two protagonists aren’t sure if they’ve helped or hindered their targets.  We, the audience, know the consequences of their actions, and it makes our journey so much better.

6.  There are so many quotable quips throughout the book that would look great on posters.  In particular, I loved:

It’s possible to have no regrets but also wish everything were different.

Every minute of being with [him] took effort, and not that I have anything against effort, but when you experience a different way of being with a person, stuff begins to make sense.

Together at Midnight 2

 

7.  Teachers/parents, Together at Midnight is a nice addition to your libraries.  There are a few discussion points that would be more appropriate for senior-level students, but nothing too earth shattering.  What your YA readers will take from this story is what I did: It’s entirely possible to be a wonderful human being even if you’re far from perfect.  Also: random acts of kindness can go a long way even if you can’t see their effects.

 

4 Squinkles

 

Jennifer Castle’s Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Tumblr | Twitter | Chapters/Indigo

 

Thank you, Harper Collins Canada, for sending me a copy of Together at Midnight in exchange for an honest review.  All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

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Alex and Eliza: A Love Story (Melissa de la Cruz)

13 Jul

I haven’t splashed around in the Hamilton craze at all, but Alex and Eliza: A Love Story might just do it for me.

 

 

Alex and Eliza

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1.  I love Melissa de la Cruz’s writing style.  It’s as if she were right there in the room with Alex and Eliza, writing down everything they say, recording every blush and secret glance.  It’s not necessarily that she speaks in period language, but there’s an authenticity to her voice that makes you lose yourself in the story rather than in wondering whether the characters are truly talking in 18th-century turns of phrases.  This is the first book I’ve read of de la Cruz’s works, though I did read enough of The Isle of the Lost (Descendants #1) to know that my students would like it, and the first two books of the series are in our school library.  (The third, which has just published, is on its way.)

2.  The setting of this story is 1777 in Albany, New York, which is part of the reason why I was intrigued by it.  I love stories set during times of great tension, and the American Revolution (and subsequent years) has so much tension.  It’s a really great backdrop for the story.

 

Alex and Eliza 2

 

3.  I like that Eliza in this take is neither prudish nor coquettish.  I’ve read essays about her relationship with the General where she’s too easily hooked by him, or she makes Alexander jump through hoops to test him.  De la Cruz’s Eliza is smart, loyal to her family, and completely aware of the constraints of her time.  She doesn’t really play hard to get, but she doesn’t bat her eyelashes unnecessarily at Alexander either.  (At least, I don’t think so.)

4.  You know that I enjoy MG stories than YA, but this particular title can very easily be read by those in elementary and high school alike.  It’s clean enough that teachers and parents don’t have to worry about explaining concepts to children that they may not be ready for.  The great thing about Alex and Eliza, too, is that the romance in it is not one that’s found in other YA stories set in modern times.  Another reason to thank the backdrop of the American Revolution.

5.  I’m the type to care more about a character’s back story than what he or she is doing at the moment.  That being said, I really want to read more of how Alex and Eliza’s marriage and family life work out.  Do they have their own places in society, or do they find adventures as a team?  (Spoiler alert: They both eventually die.  Sorry to break it to ya.)  I’m very excited that de la Cruz will be writing a follow-up called Love & War: An Alex and Eliza Story, due out in the spring of 2018 (OMG, that’s so long from now).

  

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Melissa de la Cruz’s Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr | Chapters/Indigo

 

Thank you, Penguin Random House, for sending me a copy of Alex and Eliza: A Love Story in exchange for an honest review.

 

 

All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

 

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