Kid Artists: True Tales of Childhood from Creative Legends (David Stabler)

12 Oct

I love, love, love the Kid Legends series, and this latest addition is no exception.


Kid ArtistsSquinklethoughts

1.  Kid Artists is the third installment, preceded by Kid Presidents and Kid Athletes, which are also terrific.  I love finding series that are so great that they become auto-buys.  I have no doubt I’ll be reading (and buying for our library) the next title in this collection, whatever it might be about.

2.  You’ll enjoy finding out what the childhoods of some very famous people were like.  Well-known names like Andy Warhol (who loved Campbell’s tomato soup as a child) and Dr. Seuss (rhymes with “choice”, ya know) are just some of the people you’ll read about.

3.  Sometimes, illustrious people have privileged beginnings, but many more times, they endure hardship and unsupportive friends and family in their younger years that you have to wonder how they ever produced their art.  This book gives you the good stuff and the bad stuff that made these artists not just unique, but also remarkable.

4.  I have a soft spot for Vincent van Gogh.  (One of my favourite Doctor Who episodes is Vincent and the Doctor … bawled my eyes out at (spoiler alert) the end.  Soooo great.)  Be sure to read about his beginnings.  We might never fully understand people, but we can try to appreciate what might have led them to turning points in their lives.

5.  I hadn’t heard of some of the people covered in Kid Artists, so I’m glad to have this book accessible.  There are so many cool people and events in history that we should all read about.

6. I love Doogie Horner’s people drawings.  They’re wonderful!

7.  Check out the Kid Legends website!


4.5 Squinkles


David Stabler’s Online Corners
Website | Twitter | Chapters


Thank you, Quirk Books, for sending me a copy of Kid Artists
in exchange for an honest review.

All Squinklethoughts herein are entirely my own.

My Weird School Fast Facts: Geography and Sports (Dan Gutman)

11 Oct

I love learning random facts, though I’ll be the first to admit that I don’t always remember what I’ve learned.  If you’re into geography, sports, or random trivia, you’ll find Dan Gutman’s My Weird School Fast Facts: Geography and My Weird School Fast Facts: Sports very awesome reads.


My Weird School - Geography Squinklethoughts

1.  Are you already a fan of Gutman’s My Weird School (and My Weirder School and My Weird School Daze) series, which began in 2004?  My students love these stories, which are full of memorable characters and funny dialogue.  We particularly enjoy their rockin’ rhymin’ titles like Mrs. Yonkers is Bonkers! and Mr. Harrison is Embarrassin’!.


My Weird School - 1-21 

2.  In both Geography and Sports, you get to hang out with A.J. and Andrea outside of school.  Their very different personalities make for great banter between them.  I’d like to think that they are still friends-ish even though they bother the heck out of each other a lot.

3.  There were so many places I had already known (like Pangæa and Lake Vostok), but many others that were completely new to me (like Chimborazo and West Quoddy Head).  You’ll learn a TON of new geography facts.

4.  And I haven’t forgotten about you sports fans.  You’ll love learning about how “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” began and why Ulrich Salchow’s and Alois Lutz’ names are mentioned very often in the winter.


My Weird School - Sports  

5.  I particularly enjoyed how Gutman divides each book: Geography has chapters based on various elements like water, the continents, and natural disasters.  I really liked the section where he names a few interesting facts about each US state.  Makes me want to go on a road trip!  Sports is, as you can guess, divided into chapters based on different sports.  The one on baseball is really long, so my only disappointment is that the other chapters (like the one on hockey) were just as long.  I am glad that curling and table tennis were mentioned though!  And I loved learning lots of cool stuff about the Olympics.

6.  Jim Paillot’s artwork is phenomenal.  You’ll enjoy the the drawings on each page that help bring Arlo’s and Andrea’s narrations come to life.  Definitely check out his website!


4 Squinkles 

Dan Gutman’s Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram
Chapters – Geo | Chapters – Sports


Thank you, HarperCollins, for sending me a copy of My Weird School Fast Facts: Geography and My Weird School Fast Facts: Sports
in exchange for an honest review.

All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

Wonder Women: 25 Innovators, Inventors, and Trailblazers Who Changed History (Sam Maggs)

4 Oct

We don’t have nearly enough books outlining the remarkable women of history (and of the present).  If you’re looking for a particularly good one, you should definitely pick up a copy of Sam Maggs’ Wonder Women: 25 Innovators, Inventors, and Trailblazers Who Changed History.



Squinklethoughts1. If you’ve ever had the pleasure of meeting Maggs (as I’ve been lucky enough to have had) or hearing her speak in the previews to silver-screen movies, then you know about her awesome cadence and witty remarks.  They’re all over Wonder Women, which is chock full of asides and parenthetical commentary.  I know some people aren’t fans of having too many interrupters, but I love them.  They make the stories in this book more interesting.  And funnier.

2. I only knew a handful of the women Maggs highlights in this book … which I’m sure is the same sentiment as many other readers, and which is proof-positive that WE NEED THIS BOOK in libraries and classrooms everywhere.  It’s a great introduction to fierce, intelligent, and confident women like Ada Lovelace (whom I knew) and Margaret Knight (whom I’d never heard of before now).

3. You’ll enjoy learning about Lise Meitner and her instrumental contributions to science; you’ll cheer for the gutsy Sarah Emma Edmonds who fought in the American Civil War … as a guy; and you’ll wholeheartedly agree with Maggs that Hollywood needs to make a movie about the tearjerker that was Anandibai Joshi life.

4. Sophia Foster-Dimino’s illustrations are lovely. They help bring Maggs’ words to life.

5. Because the stories of these inspirational women are reduced to a few pages, you won’t have any trouble getting through this book.  Even more, it’s really easy to jump around, so you can read about women of adventure before discovering the lives of women in espionage.

6. Teachers/parents, Wonder Women is a great read that would be an excellent purchase: it fills a gap on many bookshelves, for sure.  There are huge dollops of feminism throughout the stories (original subtitle: 25 Geek Girls Who Changed the World), but with or without labelling Maggs and her writing as such, the book stands on its own as a really fascinating and informative read.


4.5 Squinkles


Sam Maggs’ Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram |
YouTube | Tumblr | Chapters


Thank you, Quirk Books, for sending me a copy of Wonder Women in exchange for an honest review.

All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

The Alien that Ate My Socks (Brandon Dorman)

9 Sep

Meet Hank, Hector, and Henry Hooligan – three brothers who love adventure.  The only trouble is … adventure sometimes comes with a side of purple.  Purple alien, that is.  A great adventure awaits you all, Squinks, in The Alien that Ate My Socks.


Alien that Ate My Socks 


1. The action never stops.  This book begins with the Hooligan brothers competing in a go-cart race against their perpetual enemy, Rock.  Once they encounter the purple guy, it’s just one thing after another.  It was really hard for me to quit reading at the end of the night (or at the end of lunch) because each chapter ends with a cliffhanger.  Is the purple alien going to eat ALL their clothes?  Is it going to start eating the three boys or their friend, Ellie?  And what makes it smell so … ick?  I imagine green ooze wrapping itself around all that purple.

2. Hank, Hector, and Henry have such a great brotherly relationship.  They annoy one another and taunt one another, but they never stop having each other’s backs.  When Hector is hugged by the purple blob and goes temporarily noodly, Hank and Henry do what they can to get Hector back to normal.  It must be so much fun to live in the Hooligan house!

3. The illustrations are just wonderful.  Brandon Dorman is the illustrator of so many middle-grade books, including The Caretaker’s Guide to Fablehaven, by Brandon Mull, and The Curvy Tree, one of The Land of Stories tales.  I loved flipping through the book again to see the pictures, which helped bring me back to various points of the story.  You’ll love the images, too!  You most definitely need to see the rest of Dorman’s wonderful illustrations online.

4. I really locked onto Henry’s character from the get-go.  He’s quite charming and really funny with his retorts to his brothers’ jabs.  I love that he’s always wondering about what else can be replaced with superficial materials just as his teeth had to be replaced with fake ones.

5. This is the first book in the Hoolie and the Hooligans series, and I’m glad because one book just isn’t enough to cover the Hooligans’ adventures.  This book ends with such a bang … alas, that makes me impatient for the follow-up!  Don’t worry: you’ll know when I know when the next book will be published.


4 Squinkles


Brandon Dorman’s Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Instagram

Thank you, Shadow Mountain Publishing, for sending me a finished copy of Hoolie and the Hooligans 1: The Alien that Ate My Socks in exchange for an honest review.

All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

The Nameless City (Faith Erin Hicks)

15 Jun

I don’t get to read as many graphic novels as I would like, so I am quite particular about the ones that I do read. Wow, am I really glad to have come across The Nameless City by Faith Erin Hicks.


Nameless City 

Squinklethoughts1.  Why is it called the Nameless City? Because the city has been named and renamed by its invaders (of which there have been many), but its citizens try to live without paying much heed to the constant tug of wars. The easiest way to identify someone who isn’t a true citizen, then, is by hearing him/her try to name the Nameless City.

2.  I like both Kaidu and Rat, and I really enjoyed reading about their developing friendship. They’re so different, but they manage to find common ground become friends in the process. I’m happy that Hicks didn’t reveal all of their backgrounds (especially Rat’s) because I’m quite looking forward to knowing more about her and how she got to where she is in the story.

3.  Parkour fascinates me, and to have it as recurring scenes in this graphic novel really made my toes tingle!

4.  That tower in the centre of town is a mystery. It seems like a haven, but as with most interesting things, it’s the background that draws me in. I’m keen to find out more about how it came to be.

5.  The whole premise of the Nameless City being nameless is so sophisticated that at the end of the book, I was left speechless. It was like I had passed through a (very enjoyable) whirlwind. It’s almost as if while I was reading, I knew there was something great about the whole thing, but I kept that thought at bay because I knew it was complicated. Am I not making sense? Yeah, well, The Nameless City is the type of story that will make you think about the significance of words and labels, the importance of where you come from and how you’re raised, and other social issues that the city itself is mired in. Life is messy and really hard to compartmentalize, and I’m glad Hicks explored this (or is beginning to, anyway).

6.  There’s a lot of potential for the next two books of the trilogy. This is the first time I’ve encountered Faith Erin Hicks, and I’m looking forward to reading more of her work.


4.5 Squinkles 

Faith Erin Hicks’ Online Corners
Website | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr | Chapters


Thank you, First Second Books, for sending me a finished copy of
The Nameless City in exchange for an honest review.

All Squinklethoughts expressed herein are entirely my own.

%d bloggers like this: